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ARE WARS THE KEY TO TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS?

Of course, wars have nothing to defend and no use. However, when we look at the history of the world and the close relationship between technology and wars, the question arises: How many of the technologies we use today have been discovered as part of a war technology and reflected in our lives? If we lived in complete peace with no conflict; Could technologies such as the internet or telephone have not existed?

Wars are the areas where a state’s most resources are flowed. These resources include both material and human power. While the soldiers go to war, those who are left have to work many times more to close this resource gap and maintain the continuity of the country. In this sense, can wars contribute to economic and technological development?

Wars are the areas where a state’s most resources are flowed. These resources include both material and human power. While the soldiers go to war, those who are left have to work many times more to close this resource gap and maintain the continuity of the country. In this sense, can wars contribute to economic and technological development?

Societies evolve, need, and even have to make technological advances to meet both the needs of the battlefield and the needs of those left behind. Producing more effectively and distributing what is left can be possible with the presence of technological developments. Then, these technological developments and emerging tools; It is started to be used in non-military products. One of the most common examples of this situation is radar systems. During the Second World War, the first radar model used by the British Air Department was discovered by Sir Robert Watson-Watt in 1935. The device was used to detect enemy aircraft entering the airspace. With this development, it spread in a short time and caused many war strategies to change. The most interesting thing is this; A scientist named Percy L. Spencer, standing next to the Magnetron, a device that uses radar technology, noticed the chocolate in his pocket melting. As a result of his studies on this, he discovered the microwave oven. In this case, if there were no wars, there would be no need for the radar, and without the radar, a technology that we consider simple, like the microwave oven we all use today, would not have been produced, do you think?

THANKS TO WAR POSSIBLE, THE INTERNET IS BORN

Apart from the microwave oven example, what is the internet that is indispensable for all of us now? The Internet emerged in the early 1960s, thanks to the ARPANET project, an initiative of the US Department of Defense. The aim of this project was to connect computers to each other and pave the way for data exchange in order to ensure rapid communication in situations such as war. This was also important for national security. Even in a possible disaster scenario, ARPANET would have access to the country’s supercomputers. Although not directly the effect of a war, the Internet was born thanks to the possibility of war.

Another example could be our exploration of space. With the Soviet Union placing Sputnik, the first man-made satellite in orbit of the Earth in 1957; A space race started with the USA. The main purpose of this race was not who would explore space further, or the love of advancing completely innocent science. It was fear. The Soviet Union’s ability to successfully launch and place a Sputnik-sized satellite in Earth’s orbit meant that it had the technology to attack the United States with missiles at any time. Of course, the US could not stay under this. The technologies that emerged due to this conflict later formed the basis of many tools we use in daily life.

ALL TECHNOLOGIES EMERGED THROUGH THE WAR

Communication technologies, technologies developed for communication security, transportation technologies, health technologies are all; All the tools and products such as synthetic plastic, ultrasound, blood banks, penicillin, radio navigation, jet engine, telegraph are children of war. Despite these examples, it would not be correct to say that all technologies emerged thanks to war, and without wars, technology would never have improved. Not all of our creativity and inspiration comes from conflicts and conflicts. We see that technologies that emerge completely independent of wars are also used in wars, which is another question of discussion: Are technological advances the main and most fundamental reason for wars? Regardless, in this system where technology and wars are so close to each other, it seems that the questions to be asked and discussions will never end.